Python is one of the most popular programming languages around, and for good reason. It’s easy to learn, has consistent and easy to parse syntax, and is used for artificial intelligence applications, thanks to its extensive libraries and flexible structure. A passionate community has sprung up around the platform’s meteoric rise, led in no small part by its adoption at major businesses like DropBox, Reddit, and Instagram, to name a few.

If you’re looking to find Python programmers who are leading the charge, check out our list of Python developers to follow. The folks on our list have strong backgrounds in tech, are bringing new and exciting developments to the platform, and have awesome social media presence. If you’re into Python—or programming in general—you’ll want to follow them all!

Guido van Rossum

We’d be remiss to not start with Guido van Rossum, creator of Python and the language’s original Benevolent Dictator for Life. He’s put in time at a number of high-profile companies, bringing his unique platform expertise with him everywhere he goes.

Currently, he splits his time between contributing to Python and working at DropBox.

Github: https://gvanrossum.github.io/
Twitter: @gvanrossum

Ewa Jodlowska

As Executive Director of the Python Software Foundation, Ewa Jodlowska leads the platform’s long-term decision making, guiding the board of directors as they plan and resolve issues. Jodlowski is deeply involved with a number of crucial aspects of the Python organization; she also has an active Twitter presence and provides plenty of news about the language and those who work on it.

Twitter: @ewa_jodlowska

Kevin Goldsmith

Kevin Goldsmith has a storied past in engineering leadership positions at Adobe and Spotify. Now, he’s the CTO at Onfido, working on machine learning and facial recognition. If you’re curious what kind of fun he has outside of Python-related activities, his website features original photography and music.

Personal blog: https://www.kevingoldsmith.com
Twitter: @KevinGoldsmith

Jen Walraven

As a data science and engineering manager at Netflix, Jen Walraven uses data and machine learning to improve the production process. Her team uses data from shooting, editing, and localizing content to help teams stay on budget and hit deadlines.

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jen-walraven

Audrey Roy Greenfield

In addition to hosting her own blog, Code Makes , Audrey Roy Greenfield co-wrote Two Scoops of Django, a book about leveraging the Python web framework in new and interesting ways.

Personal blog: https://www.codemakesmehappy.com/
Twitter: @audreyr

Daniel Roy Greenfield

Daniel Roy Greenfield spreads the good word of Python and Django via his blog PyDanny, where you can learn more about the culture surrounding Python and how to leverage its strengths. He also co-wrote Two Scoops of Django with Audrey Roy Greenfield.

Personal blog: https://www.pydanny.com/
Twitter: @pydanny

Reshama Shaikh

Reshama Shaikh sits on the boards of a number of open source Python projects, including Women in Machine Learning and Data Science and Big Apple Py. Reshma is a great source of information on best practices in Python and DevOps. She’s also written about diversity in Python and other languages, an increasingly important topic within  the open source community.

Github: https://reshamas.github.io/
Twitter: @reshamas

Tomaz Muraus

Tomaz Muraus is an open-source enthusiast and member of the Apache Software Foundation. Tomaz has a rich background in engineering and developing for cloud systems, and a proficiency in a wide variety of platforms, Python among them. He’s also active on Twitter and his personal site, providing the curious with plenty of details on “computers, programming, startups, and life.”

Personal blog: https://www.tomaz.me
Twitter: @KamiSLO

Tom Christie

Tom Christie is a director at Encode and developed the Django REST framework, a popular API framework with over 500 contributors on GitHub. He has an active Twitter presence where he discusses the Django REST framework, other open-source projects, and the Python community.

Personal blog: http://www.tomchristie.com/
Twitter: @_tomchristie

Yury Selivanov

Yury Selivanov is the CEO and founder of EdgeDB, a database system that combines the benefits of relational databases and NoSQL document databases. He’s also a core developer for Python and a Python Software Foundation fellow. As an active contributor to a number of GitHub projects, he also posts on his Twitter account about his Python and open-source work.

Github: https://github.com/1st1
Twitter: @1st1

Raymond Hettinger

Raymond Hettinger is a Python core developer and freelance programmer. His tweets are packed with code examples, technical tips, and even the occasional Python joke. He’s given a number of informative talks at Python conferences over the years, including Keynote presentations at PyCon CA 2016 and PyBay in 2017 and 2018.

Personal blog: https://rhettinger.wordpress.com/
Twitter: @raymondh

Łukasz Langa

Łukasz Langa is a Python core developer and the release manager for Python 3.8 and 3.9. He also created Black, a code formatter for Python, which is now maintained by the Python Software Foundation. If you’re searching for news and updates on the latest Python releases, or his thoughts on music and TV, his Twitter feed is a great place to look.

GitHub: https://github.com/ambv
Twitter: @llanga

David Beazley

David Beazley wrote two books on Python: Python Essential Reference and Python Cookbook. As an educator, his personal website features upcoming classes where you can learn to tackle complex topics together. He also frequently tweets code examples and unique thoughts on programming puzzles.

Personal blog: http://www.dabeaz.com/
Twitter: @dabeaz

 

Brad Bourque is a Senior Content Editor for New Relic. He's based in Portland, Oregon and enjoys riding his bike and rooting for the Portland Timbers. View posts by .

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